-----Messaggio originale-----
Da: Cinzia 
Inviato: marted́ 5 febbraio 2002 20.10
A: forum-elettrosmog; FORUMelettrosmogCONACEM
Oggetto: [bioelectromagnetics] more on the
eye cancer/mobile phone controversy

Di seguito  abstacts di  recent lavori che  evidenziano  come i  grandi
utilizzatori di cellulari  hanno 3.3 volte di  rischio in piu' di ammalarsi
di una  rara forma  di  cancro  agli occhi .

----- Original Message -----
From: "cheesedanish2001" <Scott_Hill@dkmail.zzn.com>
To: <bioelectromagnetics@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Tuesday, February 05, 2002 3:42 PM
Subject: [bioelectromagnetics] more on the eye cancer/mobile phone
controversy


re: new Danish study on mobile phone use, eye cancer (uveal melanoma)
These are the links to the German report referred to in the Danish
article.
Note that the different articles have different conclusions!
--Scott@frontiersciences.zzn.com

Researchers link cell phones to eye cancer
By Graeme Wearden
Special to CNET News.com
January 16, 2001, 11:35 AM PT



A group of scientists claims to have discovered a link between mobile
phone use and eye cancer.
Research by the team at the University of Essen in Germany found that
people who regularly use a mobile phone are three times more likely to
develop cancer of the eye.

The scientists examined 118 patients who each suffered from uveal
melanoma--a cancer that grows in the iris and base of the retina of
the eye. They compared the history of mobile phone use of this group
with the history of a control group of 475 people.

Analysis of the results, which were published in January's
Epidemiology journal, found that those with cancer had a much higher
rate of mobile phone use.

However, Dr. Andreas Stang, who led the team of researchers, cautioned
that the study needs to be confirmed--a point backed up by
Epidemiology.

"Given the small size of their study, the relatively crude exposure
assessment, the absence of attention to...other possible confounding
variables and limited support in the literature, a cautious
interpretation of their results is indicated," read an editorial
accompanying the research.

A spokesman for the Federation of Electrical Industries, an industry
body for mobile phone companies, insisted that the findings of the
Essen group need to be reproduced in subsequent studies.

"This is only preliminary research, and only one among lots of studies
which have come to different conclusions. These results need to be
replicated," he said.

In the abstract that summarized its research, the Essen group agreed
that its research alone does not fully prove a link. "Several
methodologic limitations prevent our results from providing clear
evidence on the hypothesized association," the group acknowledges.

In December, an American study into a possible link between mobile
phone use and cancer failed to find a connection, but did suggest that
more research over a long time frame is needed.

Earlier this month, a team at a Spanish university announced that
mobile phones have a greater effect on human brain cells than was
previously thought. The scientists, based at Madrid's University
Complutense, discovered that a cell's nonspherical shape increases the
intensity of the electric field generated within it by a mobile phone.

And writing in The Lancet in December, British scientist Dr. Gerard
Hyland warned that children are at the greatest risk from mobile phone
radiation--specifically from low-intensity, pulsed radiation that
could affect a number of brain functions.

Related News
What risks do you face using your mobile phone?
Get this story's "Big Picture"



A German study purports to find a statistically significant link
between a rare form of eye cancer and mobile telephone use, but its
authors say the topic still needs more research.

Scientists from the Essen University Clinic queried 118 patients with
uveal melanoma about their telephone usage patterns, and compared the
results with a control group of 475 healthy individuals, said a
statement released by the university. They found that heavy users of
mobile devices are 3.3 times more likely to develop the disease. The
team published their findings in the current issue of the journal
"Epidemiology."

Authors Dr. Andreas Stang and Professor Karl-Heinz Jvckel said they
could in no way rule out the possibility that other causes explain the
higher cancer rate among the survey population, and called for further
research. The study did not measure the radiation levels to which the
patients were exposed.

Uveal melanoma is a relatively unusual tumor, with a rate of only one
new case per year in 100,000 people.

The authors added that they believe it would have been better to carry
out complete studies on the health consequences of mobile phone use
parallel to the introduction of the technology.

Controversy has raged over suspicions of health risks associated with
mobile phones; recent studies on a purported link between the devices
and brain tumors have yielded conflicting results. The Journal of the
American Medical Association and the New England Journal of Medicine
last month called the link unlikely, but called for continued
examination of the issue.

The Essen University Clinic can be reached online at
http://www.uni-essen.de/.

 Mobile phones linked to eye cancer

January 16, 2001
URL:
http://www.zdnet.com.au/newstech/news/story/0,2000025345,20108167,00.h
tm


A German study has found a connection between mobile phone use and eye
cancer, but scientists insist wider corroboration is needed.

A group of scientists claims to have discovered a link between mobile
phone use and eye cancer.

Research by the team at the University of Essen in Germany found that
people who regularly use a mobile are three times more likely to
develop cancer of the eye.

The scientists examined 118 patients who each suffered from uveal
melanoma - a cancer which grows in the iris and base of the retina of
the eye. They compared the mobile phone use history of this group with
the history of a control group of 475 people.

Analysis of the results, which were published in January's
Epidemiology journal, found that those with cancer had a much higher
rate of mobile phone use.

However, Dr Andreas Stang, who led the team of researchers, does
caution that the study needs to be confirmed - a point backed up by
Epidemiology.

"Given the small size of their study, the relatively crude exposure
assessment, the absence of attention to UVR exposure or other possible
confounding variables, and limited support in the literature, a
cautious interpretations of their results is indicated," read an
editorial accompanying the research.

Britain's Sunday Times claimed that the discovery was the first
scientifically proven link between mobile phone use and cancer.

However, a spokesman for the Federation of Electrical Industries
(FEI), the industry body for mobile phone companies, disputed this.

"I don't think there would be so much uncertainly if this was the
first study to imply a link," he said.

The FEI spokesman insisted that the findings of the Essen group would
have to be reproduced in subsequent studies. "This is only preliminary
research, and only one among lots of studies which have come to
different conclusions. These results need to be replicated," he said.

In the abstract which summarised their research, the Essen group agree
that their research alone does not fully prove a link. "Several
methodologic limitations prevent our results from providing clear
evidence on the hypothesized association," they admit.

In December, an American study into a possible link between mobile
phone use and cancer failed to find a connection, but did suggest that
more study over a long time-span was needed.

Earlier this month, a team at a Spanish University announced that
mobile phones have a greater effect on human brain cells than was
previously thought. The scientists, based at Madrid's University
Complutense, discovered that a cell's non-spherical shape increases
the intensity of the electric field generated within it by a mobile
phone.

Writing in The Lancet in December, UK scientist Dr Gerard Hyland
warned that children are at the greatest risk from mobile phone
radiation - specifically from low-intensity, pulsed radiation which
could affect a number of brain functions.


from: wireless web news
http://wireless.iop.org/article/news/2/1/21
Scientists link mobile phones to eye cancer
Researchers at Germany's University of Essen Institute for Medical
Informatics, Biometry and Epidemiology (IMIBE) have published
statistical data that suggest a link between the use of mobile phones
and the eye cancer uveal melanoma.

Writing in the January issue of the journal Epidemiology, Andreas
Stang and colleagues described a study of 118 cancer patients and a
control group of 475 healthy individuals.

Although the data show an association between phone use and incidence
of the cancer, the researchers state that the study does not provide
clear evidence that a link exists.

from: http://www.cpaaindia.org/infocentre/clipping_eye.htm

Eye Cancer

German Scientists Link Mobile Phones To Eye Cancer-(Cancer
Info-17/01/2001)*


 German Scientists Link Mobile Phones To Eye Cancer-(Cancer
Info-17/01/2001)

Researchers at Germany's Essen University have concluded that mobile
phone users may be up to 3.3 times as likely to develop cancer of the
eye. A research team found that the incidence of eye tumors in a
normal population is around one in 100,000 every year. However, after
interviewing 118 people with uveal melanoma and comparing their mobile
phone usage with a control group of 475 people without the cancer, the
researchers found a higher incidence of eye cancer among the regular
mobile phone users than those that did not use a cellular phone.


The researchers were at pains to stress that the findings should not
be treated as conclusive, adding that further scientific investigation
will be required to support or disprove the theory.


Previous research into uveal melanoma has suggested that cells within
the uveal layer, a layer of melanocyte cells behind the retinal layer
of the eye, will grow and divide rapidly when exposed to high
frequency radiation, such as that from a microwave.


Eye Clinic, University of Essen

The Eye Clinic (Augenklinik) of the University of Essen is a National
Center for treatment of patients with cancer of the eye and part of a
network devoted to cancer research.

As part of a "Klinische Forschergruppe" that is funded by the DFG, the
research project will investigate metastasis-formation in uveal
melanoma. In addition to a strong background in molecular biology the
successful applicant should have experience in cell culture
techniques.
 Application including:  CV and 3 references

 should be sent to:  PD Dr. med. Harald Schilling
Augenklinik
Abteilung f|r Erkrankungen des hinteren Augenabschnitts
Hufelandstrasse 55
45122 Essen
Phone: +49(201) 723-2900
Fax: +49(201) 723-5917
E-mail: harald.schilling@uni-essen.de



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


************** FORUM **** ELETTROSMOG **** CONACEM ******************